Kids Can Teach Themselves?

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Dr. Maria Montessori once wrote that when we remove all of our misconceptions of children, we will see a superior child emerge. Perhaps we are seeing a glimpse of Montessori’s “superior child” in the experience Sugata Mitra shares with us in his 2013 TED Talk, Children Can Teach Themselves. His experience and discovery, should give all educators pause and question if we are pursuing the right path in our approach to educating today’s children.

Indian education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education — the best teachers and schools don’t exist where they’re needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

Bio
Sugata Mitra is Professor of Educational Technology at the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences at Newcastle University, England. He is best known for his “Hole in the Wall” experiment, and widely cited in works on literacy and education. He is Chief Scientist, Emeritus, at the for-profit training company NIIT.

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Is Creativity Important to Education?

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In this now famous TED Talk, Sir Ken Robinson asks a critical question: “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” Asks us to examine how important creativity is to education, to students and to the richness of our culture. He further supports his views on education and the importance of creativity in this 2015 book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education.

Bio
Sir Kenneth Robinson is a British author, speaker and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education and arts bodies. He was Director of the Arts in Schools Project (1985–89) and Professor of Arts Education at the University of Warwick (1989–2001), and is now Professor Emeritus at the same institution, In 2003 he was knighted for services to art. Robinson now lives in Los Angeles with his wife and children. This video of Robinson’s presentation TED Talk is the second most watched TED talk of all time  with more than 13 million views(2017).

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